Pages Menu
TwitterRssFacebook
Categories Menu

Posted by on Jan 4, 2016 in Art, Craftsmanship & Manual Labor, Culture, Economy, Education, Finance, Media, Nonprofit, Politics, Science, Technology, Theology, Work, World | 0 comments

Announcement: Launch of the 5280 Fellowship

Announcement: Launch of the 5280 Fellowship

Today is a big day. Today my colleagues and I at Denver Institute for Faith & Work, in partnership with Gordon College, announce the launch of the 5280 Fellowship, a 9 month experience for emerging leaders beginning in the fall of 2016. After years of planning, design and forging partnerships, each element of the program has fallen into place. And now what we are now offering is, I believe, one of the best faith-based fellowship programs in the US, and perhaps Denver’s premiere leadership experience for young professionals. I know those are big claims. But I believe the 5280 Fellowship has the potential to deeply impact Denver for generations to come. And I’m not alone. Some of Denver’s finest pastors – like Robert Gelinas (Colorado Community Church), Brad Strait (Cherry Creek Presbyterian), Rob Brendle (Denver United), Brian Brown (Park Church) and Hunter Beaumont (Fellowship Denver) – believe the Fellowship can be a life-changing experience for young professionals who want to deeply engage themes of calling, work, and culture. Young...

Read More

Posted by on Oct 27, 2015 in Economy, World | 1 comment

Obsessed With Work – or Just Bored?: Bringing the Conversation About Work Across Acoma Street

Obsessed With Work – or Just Bored?: Bringing the Conversation About Work Across Acoma Street

  It’s well past 1pm. Across Acoma Street, I see a woman in her early 20s, baggy sweat pants and cigarette hanging out her mouth, tossing an empty Mountain Dew bottle in a dumpster that’s been parked in her driveway for months. She squints at the sun, as if it’s an unwelcome guest disturbing her slumber. Next door is a man, mid forties, sitting on his porch. Can of Coors Light in hand, he chats with his cat, as if expecting to hear a punch line to a joke. A broken beer bottle shimmers on his sidewalk. Of course, being the upper white middle class office dweller that I am, I type emails furiously at my computer, staring at them both, wondering why they aren’t working. But maybe I shouldn’t be so shocked. Some argue that our culture is obsessed with work. But is that really true? To be fair, yes, it’s true for a narrow slice of the population. The top 10% define themselves – find their deepest worth and value...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 24, 2015 in Economy, Politics, Work, World | 0 comments

Let Them Eat Chicken: Religious Intolerance Is Bad for Business

Let Them Eat Chicken: Religious Intolerance Is Bad for Business

  by Chris Horst and Jeff Haanen Denver is on the rise. Construction cranes line the streets around Union Station. New residents arrive faster than we can house them. But as Denver surges, will our city be a place where religious people are permitted to live and work? Given the recent news, it’s a fair question to ask. Last month, a Denver federal appeals court ruled against Little Sisters of the Poor, a Catholic ministry serving low-income elderly and dying people in Colorado and around the world. The nuns believe new federal health care requirements force them to violate their faith by mandating they pay for abortion-inducing drugs for employees. Sister Loraine Marie Maguire, one of the nuns serving at Little Sisters of the Poor,  said, “We… simply cannot choose between our care for the elderly poor and our faith.”   Then, last month, the Denver City Council impeded the approval of a new restaurant lease at Denver International Airport (DIA). The “normally routine” approval process met a roadblock when several members...

Read More

Posted by on Sep 18, 2013 in World | 0 comments

Helping Colorado’s Flood Victims

Helping Colorado’s Flood Victims

The West’s Hurricane Katrina has hit. My sister, who lives in Fort Collins, has said the scene is surreal. Churches packed with families, helicopters still rescuing people from the mountains, entire towns ravaged with water. Perhaps one of the biggest tragedies is the media. It’s on the homepage of cnn.com one day, but on to another story the next. Yet the destruction and the human need is still growing. Covering disaster, it seems, is not as popular as covering efforts to rebuild. But rebuilding is what now needs to happen. Here are three ideas anybody can do to help: Give personally. If you live in Colorado, go and volunteer to help flood victims. Offer to begin the arduous process of gutting homes and businesses to rebuild. Give groceries, loan your car, open you home to victims. If you’re outside of Colorado, give to one of many local charities on the ground. Volunteer with your whole office. Talk to your boss, and in the next two weeks, take a day...

Read More

Posted by on Feb 27, 2013 in Politics, World | 2 comments

Disadvantage yourself to advantage others

Disadvantage yourself to advantage others

  The leader of Mexico’s powerful teacher’s union, Elba Esther Gordillo, was recently arrested on charges of embezzling millions of dollars. The details are still coming out, but apparently Gordillo used public money to fund houses in California, cosmetic surgery, and even a hefty Neiman Marcus account. The numbers vary widely, but authorities were recently tipped off when a suspicious transfer of $200 million dollars funded the personal accounts of 3 individuals in the teachers union. Now, what’s astounding about this story is the sheer volume of money. Authorities believe that over Gordillo’s 20 years in Mexican politics, she may have stolen hundreds of millions of dollars. This is no single Rolex watch, or even the theft of $750,000 dollars for personal expenses (like Jesse Jackson Jr recently pleaded to). This is widespread, institutional corruption. Figures like Gordillo, one of Latin America’s most powerful women, are rarely if ever called out for their crimes. Gordillo was a “kingmaker” for her ability to turn out votes on election day; yet...

Read More

Posted by on Jan 10, 2013 in World | 0 comments

Training with Coach Kibomango

Training with Coach Kibomango

One of my favorite blogs on the integration of faith and work around the world is Smorgasblurb, the blog of my friend Chris Horst. Chris is the Director of Advancement for Hope International, a nonprofit that majors on justice, and minors on micro-finance and small business development to alleviate poverty around the globe. He’s not only a highly competent leader, but he shares some of the finest stories around on how to apply the gospel, especially in the developing world. His latest story is on Coach Kibomango, a man who grew up as a child soldier but now runs one of Congo’s best boxing clubs. Here’s how it starts: Coach Kibomango fights with just one eye. He lost his other eye in a bomb explosion in his hometown of Goma, Congo. Kibomango grew up fighting as a child soldier, but today he is one of Congo’s top boxers. And he’s helping other former child soldiers cope with the heavy baggage they carry out of war. Kibomango can’t keep the...

Read More